• Lessons from closed doors

    Roxie under a towel, moving swiftly as usual

    I like doors. I like being able to make a mess and leave it for the conclusion of the project. If you’re always having to clean up after yourself, you spend half your time doing just that. Give me a room with a door any day. Close the door on the room and forget about the mess.

    Roxie doesn’t see it this way. If there is a door in front of her, she wants to know why she can’t go through it. Some of our lovely old doors are getting deep scratches from her insistent “knocking.” In particular, she likes my prayer room. It’s like a puppy playground: things to jump on, crawl under, places to hide, fabric to chew.

    Roxie is described in the Corgi book as “a happy omnivore.” She will eat anything, ANYTHING that is put in front of her. Poop from other animals–yummy. Sticks–roughage. Asphalt–toothsome. Plastic–crunchy. Socks have the funk of a good blue cheese. In short, anything that is on the ground and not in her regular vocabulary of items goes into her mouth.

    Yet when I confine Roxie to just the kitchen she gets bored. Granted, I could leave Draino on the floor and she would leave it alone. There can be lots of weird things things on the floor that she’ll leave alone. She’s safe when confined to the kitchen, but she’s not living a free and happy puppy life.

    Roxie's portrait

    Still slightly blurred, but better

    I want to keep Roxie safe, but I also want her to be free and happy. So we make excursions into other parts of the house. Together, we open the doors and explore. Closing off rooms is OK for a while, but someone will eventually come knocking, and they may show you your room in a whole new and more playful light.

    Lord, help me to set my house in order so that you may dwell in it and others may have a safe place to explore and perhaps find you. Amen.

    Post Tagged with ,

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *